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HVAC Equipment Cost Database

Are you paying too much for your HVAC equipment? How do you know if the quote you received for your equipment is a fair price? Do you have a method of comparing what you have paid for various HVAC equipment with what is being quoted currently?

Keeping track of the cost of HVAC Equipment allows you to quickly provide budgets and check the cost of equipment before you purchase. This database allows you to easily keep track of the most common HVAC equipment.

HVAC Equipment Cost Database

Using an HVAC Equipment cost database will save you a lot of money by avoiding the costly mistake of paying too much for equipment.

Air Conditioners price per ton and price per square feet historical equipment pricing database
Air Conditioners in Historical Pricing HVAC Equipment Database

Get your copy here. HVAC Equipment Cost Database

The HVAC Equipment Cost database keeps track of all your equipment quotes or purchases for easy reference and parametric checks, such as cost per ton ($/Ton), cost per CFM ($/CFM)

Only $149

HVAC Piping Unit Pricing

For an HVAC Piping & Plumbing Estimator the need for quick budgets for the installation of piping is best handled with a matrix of different material types and sizes. Having an estimating software program can make this process a lot easier as the material pricing is always up to date and can be entered into the matrix quickly. 

HVAC Piping Unit Pricing Table
HVAC Piping Unit Pricing Calculator

UNIT PRICING 

Often the requirements of the RFP or bidding instructions will call for the price per foot to install piping beyond that which is required by the contract drawings. Such pricing maybe used for change-orders. Having these numbers available and updated often also gives you a quick reference for budgeting projects. It’s good to know when doing job site comparisons of different piping options or during discussions with engineering, what the cost is for the various piping sizes and types of materials. 

HVAC Piping Unit Pricing Calculator for Copper and Carbon Steel from 1/2" to 14"
HVAC Piping Unit Pricing Calculator for Copper and Carbon Steel from 1/2″ to 14″

COST PER FOOT

The cost per foot for the installation of piping needs to include fittings and hangers prorated into the value. It’s best to look at a standard length of pipe and then figure that you will have a Tee and 90 degree elbow in that length. So for example, using twenty feet of copper water pipe with a Tee and 90 degree elbow plus the hangers to build a unit price would represent a field condition of a fitting every ten feet. For higher density projects like Hospitals you could put more fittings in your unit pricing. Total those cost up and then divide by 20 to derive at a cost per foot for that particular size and material type.

20 feet of pipe + 2 Fittings + 3 Hangers / 20 = Cost per Foot

If the piping is insulated, you can also put the values in for insulation.

The Estimating Wizard provides two spreadsheets for tracking unit pricing, one for HVAC Piping and the other for Plumbing piping. Get a copy and start tracking your cost per foot, or be prepared to give a quick budget based on your knowledge from your spreadsheet of unit prices. Watch the video on the estimating Wizard website and see how quick and easy it is to track the cost per foot for various sozes and material types. 

MEP Academy HVAC Piping Unit Pricing Calculator

The MEP Academy provides a spreadsheet that makes calculating unit pricing simple. The spreadsheet is available on the MEP Academy website https://mepacademy.com

HVAC Piping Unit Pricing Calculator Example
HVAC Piping Unit Pricing Calculator Example

In the screenshot above there is a place for you to build your hanger requirements (#1), and a place to put your tax rate and hourly labor rate (#2).

For each size of pipe and material type you would insert the unit cost for Material (#3) and Labor (#4).

Under item (#5) you would build your typical run of pipe and enter the quantity of fittings you might expect for the type of building and system. You would add whatever you think will be required for every so many feet of pipe. In the example above we are showing that for every 20 feet of pipe you will have 1 Elbow and 1 Reducing Tee.

Under item (#6) you would add the cost per lineal foot for insulation if required. You could also look at insulation as a separate value and leave the pipe bare.

Line item (#7) is where you indicate the hanger spacing, and for each hanger you defined under item (#1) you will get the quantity as defined by the linear feet in item (#5) divided by your hanger spacing, which will affect your cost.

Line item (#8) is the calculated cost per linear foot of piping for that size and material type of pipe.

Summary Sheet

After you have all your unit pricing information inputted into the spreadsheet, all you have to do to get a budget for installing piping is to enter the quantity of piping (#9) for each size and material type (#10). The system will automatically calculate the cost (#11) to install that run of piping based on your unit pricing data. The total cost will be shown at the top of the spreadsheet (#12).

Piping Unit Pricing Calculator Summary Page
Piping Unit Pricing Calculator Summary Page

AC Condensate Drain Sizing and Layout

The proper sizing and layout of condensate drain lines is important for the protection of property and for the proper functioning of the air conditioning equipment.

Condensate Drain Pipe Sizing

The size required for the condensate pipe is dictated by the local code. Enclosed you will find the requirements for many local codes, but be sure to check your code for your local requirements. If the outlet size of the equipment’s condensate drain is larger than what’s shown in this chart then your required to use the larger outlet size.

Minimum Condensate Drain Pipe Sizing Chart
Minimum Condensate Drain Pipe Sizing Chart

Slope to be at least 1/8” per foot or 1 percent, that is for every 12” horizontally there must be at least an 1/8” drop vertically. 

Condensate drain piping to slope a minimum of 1/8" per every 12" horizontal
Condensate drain piping to slope a minimum of 1/8″ per every 12″ horizontal

Attics or Furred Spaces

If the Air Conditioner is suspended above an inaccessible ceiling, such as a gypsum board ceiling or attic space then you will need to provide a means for protecting the building elements from the overflow of the primary drain and for indicating that there is a leak.

Also, drain pans that are poorly drained can cause water to stay in the pan risking the possibility of algae and bacteria growth. Below are some possible solutions, but as always check your local code for the approved method.

  • Option 1 – Secondary drain pan with drain piping. This would hang below the Air Conditioning unit in case the A/C units primary pan overflowed. Also, there is a requirement to provide secondary drain piping to a point of termination that would provide notification to the occupants that there is a leak, such as terminating above a window or doorway.
Option 1 - Secondary drain pan with piping terminating in observable location
Option 1 – Secondary drain pan with piping terminating in observable location

  • Option 2 – An additional drain pipe connection that sits above the primary drain connection and whereby the secondary drain piping terminates in a location to alert the occupants of the clogged primary drain.
Option 2 - Secondary drain piping connection to primary drain pan
Option 2 – Secondary drain piping connection to primary drain pan

  • Option 3 – Leak detection device that automatically shuts down the Air Conditioner if the primary drain becomes clogged.
Option 3 - Primary drain with leak detection device
Option 3 – Primary drain with leak detection device

  • Option 4 – Secondary drain pan with leak detection, located beneath the coil that shuts down the unit upon a leak.
Option 4 - Secondary drain pan with leak detection
Option 4 – Secondary drain pan with leak detection

The additional drain pan or drain pan connection shall be provided with a drain pipe that will determinate in an observable area, such as in front a window or above a doorway, and be of a size not less than 3/4”. Secondary drain pan shall not be less than 1-1/2” in height and extend 3” wider on each side of the coil or AC unit.

Secondary drain piping terminating above window. Pipe doesn't have to be visible as shown.
Secondary drain piping terminating above window. Pipe doesn’t have to be visible as shown.

Video of this Article

Drain Termination 

Where can and can’t you terminate the air conditioners condensate drain piping? There are several options where you can terminate the condensate drain line;

  • Indirect Drain
  • Condensate Pump to Indirect Drain
  • Drywell
  • Leach pits
  • Landscaped areas that are properly designed to handle the volume of condensate
  • To Properly designed stormwater treatment systems. 

Indirect Drain

  • Lavatory tailpiece in the same tenant space as the air conditioner
  • Laundry standpipe
  • Janitors Sink
  • Inlet of Bathtub Overflow – Must be accessible
  • Collect and send to cooling tower (See description below)
Cooling Coil condensate to sink tailpiece.
Cooling Coil condensate to sink tailpiece.

The connection to a plumbing fixtures tailpiece has to be made within the same tenant space as the air conditioner cooling coil that is generating the condensate.

Drywell

A drywell can be used for the termination of your air conditioners condensate drain. Check your local code for the specifics, but generally it includes some or all of the following depending on whether it’s for residential or a commercial project:

  1. A minimum size hole, such as 2 foot by 2 foot by 3 feet deep, or a round hole such as 12” diameter by 3 feet deep.
  2. A minimum of 6” of soil or concrete shall provide cover above the rocks
  3. Some form of barrier between the soil and the top of the drywell where the rock begins, such as building paper or plastic
  4. Drywell to be filled with gravel or crushed rock, often with a stated minimum size rock such as 1 inch diameter
  5. The termination of the condensate drain pipe shall connect indirectly to the drywell drain pipe.
  6. The drywell drain pipe to be a minimum of 1-1/2” PVC or other approved material.
  7. Drywell to be at least three feet away from the building structure or any footings.
Drywall for Air Conditioner Cooling Coil Condensate
Drywall for Air Conditioner Cooling Coil Condensate

There are various methods of providing drywells depending on the local code. There are prefabricated drywells that can be used and ones that are made by using a large diameter piece of PVC pipe or similar material.

Some codes will require you to collect the condensate from cooling coil drain pans and return it to the cooling tower if the equipment is served by a cooling tower and the total combined capacity of the HVAC cooling coils exceeds a certain amount like 65,000 btu/hr. This is a water conservation measure, and there are some exceptions to this requirement, such as if the total capacity of the AC Equipment cooling coils are less than 10% of the total capacity of the cooling tower, or if the location of those AC Cooling coils are in a remote location, far from the tower.

Some locations where you can’t terminate condensate;

  • Public ways
  • Sidewalks
  • Driveways
  • Alleys
No termination of condensate on public area ways
No termination of condensate on public area ways

Excluded from Code Requirements

Excluded from these codes are non-condensing type of equipment like radiant cooling panels that are designed to prevent condensate from occurring by keeping the temperature of the chilled water above the dew point temperature/vapor pressure of the surrounding air. These are system designed to operate in sensible cooling only modes.

Piping Material

The material types that can be used for condensate drain piping varies by jurisdiction but the most commonly cited materials are: 

  • Copper
  • PVC – DWV
  • CPVC
  • ABS – DWV
  • Polyethylene
  • Galvanized steel
  • Cast iron.

Also the use of short radius 90-degree elbows are often prohibited. You can normally use standard fittings until you reach a certain size at which point you might be required to use drainage pattern fittings (DWV)

Traps

Traps are to be installed as required per the manufactures recommendation. No traps are required on the secondary drain pan, this is to allow immediate notification that the primary drain has failed.

Cleanouts

Cleanouts are required in case of plugged drain pipes. Provide as required to prevent the need to cut drain pipes for unplugging. Some of the following maybe used for cleanouts if approved by your local code authority;

  • Plugged tees
  • Union connections
  • Short clamped hoses at the unit (see image above)

When you have more than one air conditioning unit condensate tied to a main condensate pipe, then every change of direction shall have some method of cleanout. Check your local code as this maybe a requirement for even a single air conditioners condensate piping.

Condensate Pumps

Condensate pumps can be used to elevate the condensate vertically to a point where it will then discharge into a code approved gravity sloping condensate drain line. The condensate pump should be interlocked with the Air Conditioning Unit to prevent its operations if the condensate pump is inoperable. 

Please remember that code requirements are always changing, so check for the most current code in your area at the time of design and installation. Or ask an inspector for the current installation practice.

MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet

Having an MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet that automates portions of your estimates saves you valuable time that you could use to make more sales. All aspects of the cost of furnishing and installing an HVAC or Plumbing system is contained in one spreadsheet made specifically for the MEP industry. New Electrical section coming soon.

Dashboard

The Main Dashboard provides you with all the information you need to make a quick decision on whether to make further adjustments, or if one of the metrics looks out of place based on historical data. The Dashboard gives you a quick overview of all that is going on within the Estimating Spreadsheet.

Estimating Dashboard within the MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet

Your MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet needs to be able to handle rental equipment, general conditions, subcontractors, piping and plumbing takeoffs, sheet metal, labor rate tables with crew mix capabilities, , and a bid summary. Each sheet in the estimating spreadsheet automatically calculates the values you enter, showing you a new total bid amount.

Will cover portions of the MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet starting at the back of the Excel spreadsheet and working our way toward the front summary page last.

Labor Rate & Crew Mix Table

Choose your crew mix based on the level of experience and the different pay scales based on each project. Pick any combination and quantity of tradesman based on the requirements of the project. 

Labor Rates and Crew Size within the MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet

There is a separate crew labor rate for HVAC Piping Shop & Field, Sheet Metal Shop & Field, and Plumbing.

Labor Crew Size and Labor Rate
Labor Crew Size and Labor Rate

HVAC & Plumbing Equipment

Enter the project equipment price and labor to rig the HVAC and Plumbing equipment into place. Compare supplier pricing easily side by side. The MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet automatically selects the lowest bidder but lets you override that decision.

HVAC Equipment page within the Estimating Spreadsheet
HVAC & Plumbing Equipment Sheets

General Conditions

Do you need a jobsite trailer or onsite management? Enter the quantity and level of the staff required to run the project, whether one person or dozens. Set the quantity and duration of each general condition, along with the rate. General Conditions is broken down into three sections as follows: #1 – Management, #2 – Construction Office (Non-Reoccurring Expenses), and #3 – Construction Office (Reoccurring Expenses).

General Conditions in Estimate
General Conditions in Estimate Spreadsheet

HVAC & Plumbing Subcontractors

HVAC & Plumbing contractors often subcontract out for Air & Water Balance, Sheet Metal & Piping Insulation, Water Treatment, Building Automation, Excavation and other specialty trades that they don’t self-perform. This spreadsheet was made especially for the HVAC & Plumbing contractor and their most often used subcontractors.

Subcontractors – Rentals – GC’s – Engineering Pages
Subcontractors Page in Spreadsheet

Plumbing Fixtures

For those contractors that do plumbing the following Plumbing Fixture sheet will give you a place to record your vendors quotes and the labor it takes to install each type of fixture. What is also revealed is the overall cost per fixture.

Plumbing Fixtures page within the Estimating Spreadsheet
Plumbing Fixtures

MEP Specialty Sheets

Each trade has a specialty sheet for those items that aren’t considered equipment or a fixture, but for which there is a cost impact. The MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet includes Sheet Metal, HVAC Piping & Plumbing Specialty sheets.

HVAC and Plumbing Specialty Pages within the Estimating Spreadsheet
Specialty Sheet In Estimating Spreadsheet
Specialty Sheets in Estimate Spreadsheet

Material & Labor Summary Sheets

You will find a Sheet Metal, HVAC Piping & Plumbing material & labor summary sheets where all of the other specialty sheets are summarized for your review and last minute edits. Each sheet will be divided between field & shop fabrication work. The first section covers the field installation items.

Sheet Metal Material and Labor Summary – Estimating Spreadsheet

Field Summary Section

This is where you will put your material takeoff information for the following:

  • Rectangular & Round Ductwork
  • HVAC Piping
  • Plumbing Piping

This is also where the other sheets that you filled out will be summarized, such as the following;

  • HVAC & Plumbing Specialties
  • HVAC & Plumbing Equipment Labor
  • Plumbing Fixtures
Material & Labor Summary Sheet in Estimating Spreadsheet
Material and Labor Summaries

Each of the field labor summary sheets contain a row to add for the following

  • Material Handling
  • Consumables
  • Punch List
  • Cleanup
  • Detailing
  • Supervision

Shop Fabrication Summary Section

For those of you that have a fabrication shop, there is a section to add material and labor.

Shop Fabrication Summary
Shop Fabrication Summary

Rentals

For those HVAC air conditioning and Plumbing projects that require a crane, fork lift, scissor lift or any other equipment that you don’t own but will be required on the project. Having a spreadsheet that maintains a list of the most common equipment you normally rent along with their rental rate will save you time and money while avoiding having to call for pricing on every job.

Rental Sheet in Estimating Spreadsheet
Rental Sheet in Estimating Spreadsheet

Engineering

If you do your own design then you should have a sheet of each of the personnel responsible for spending time on the engineering task. If you’re doing design/build work, but don’t do the engineering yourself, but hire a third party, then you should add some engineering review time. It’s your responsibility to manage your third-party engineer to make sure they design within your cost parameters.

Engineering Cost
Engineering Cost Tab in Estimating Spreadsheet

Estimate Summary

All of your estimates are summarized on the last tab of the  MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet for easy review. You can quickly scan each of the categories to see where all the project cost has shown up. There is the labor and material summary for HVAC Sheet Metal, HVAC Piping, and Plumbing and another section for Subcontractors, General Conditions, Rentals, etc.

Estimating Spreadsheet Summary Page
Estimating Summary
MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet Summary

Bid Risk Assessment Form

The MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet contains a bid risk assessment form that rates the success of winning any particular project that you are contemplating pursuing. The risk assessment form will help you determine if the project is worth bidding based on a set of questions that rate your answers.

Bid Risk Assessment Form
Bid Risk Assessment

The answers to these questions will give you a score from which you can use to see how the project rates on a scale of risk and reward. The total risk assessment score will also inform you which level of approval is required within your company depending on how you rate your risk values as the example shown below. The total score is 25, which according to this contractor would require the Vice President to sign-off on the project or approve the decision to pursue bidding on the project.

Bid Risk Assessment Score
Bid Risk Assessment Score

MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet Summary

The MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet is used to gather all the information for estimating a project, putting it into a format where you can make quick adjustments and decisions while the spreadsheet gives you an immediate update on the price.

Purchase this spreadsheet at its currently reduced price of ONLY $195.00, which usually sells for $599.00

Watch the YouTube video below to see the MEP Academy Estimating Spreadsheet in action.

Buy Now for ONLY $195

Construction Job Walk Basics 101

If the project is new construction, then there won’t be much to see except where the proposed building will be set on the lot and some of the logistics such as allowable lay-down area for materials and job site trailers/offices.

For retrofit projects of existing buildings there are some important aspects of the project walk that you will want to be sure to capture while your there if not already provided in the bid documents.

In order to get the most of your time when attending a project Job Walk you should get at least the following information.

Photo or Video of Existing Conditions and Equipment

Its important to take a lot of pictures of the area and equipment that is affected by the renovation. You’ll use these photos or videos back at the office during your review so that you can share what you saw with the team involved with assembling the bid. Often, you’ll see something in the photo that you didn’t notice during the job walk which the photos and videos allow you to review at a more relax environment.

Equipment Labels
Equipment Labels
  1. Equipment Labels
    • Make sure to get a good picture of all the existing equipment that needs to be remove or replaced.
    • Take a picture of the equipment labels that identify the make and model number of the piece of equipment plus all the additional capacity information listed.
    • Get a picture of the electrical panel that serves the existing, including the inside list of breakers. The photo will also show which breakers are being used and also which are in the off position.
  2. 360 Degree View of Area and Equipment
    • Take a picture on all four sides of any equipment or area involved in the renovation. This is important so that you can review any side of the equipment back at the office.
  3. Auxiliary Equipment and Accessories
    • Make sure to get pictures of any ancillary equipment that is part of the renovation, such as expansion tanks, plumbing fixtures or electrical.
    • Electrical panels related to the work if new circuits are required or are to be upgraded.
    • Control panels or controllers that need to be replaced or upgraded.
  4. Panoramic Views
    • Step back from the actual equipment as much as makes sense to get a good overall photo of the area of work. Sometimes those walking the project will get good closeup pictures of the equipment but won’t give an overall view of the total area. It’s easy to zoom in on a long shot picture, but that’s impossible with one that is already shot up close.
Job Walk Basics Panoramic Photo
Job Walk Basics Panoramic Photo – Step Back and Take a Picture from a distance
  • 5) Similar Equipment
    • Often the project may require you to replace equipment that looks the same, such as replacing all the rooftop Air Conditioners. In this case in order to keep your photos organized as to which photo belongs to which AC unit, you’ll need some way to identify each.
    • If there are equipment tags on each unit, then take a picture of the tag first and then another for each side of the AC unit or similar equipment before moving onto the next. If there are no equipment tags, then you can make your own by writing on a piece of paper the Equipment Tag, such as AC-1, then taking a photo of your written tag, then each side of the AC unit.

Dimensions of Important Items

The following are some of the items to thing about getting dimensions of while you’re onsite.

  1. Equipment pads or platforms
    • Dimensions of concrete pads or platforms where the new equipment will sit.
  2. Rigging Pathway
    • If you are moving old equipment out and new equipment in, then you will need to measure hallways and doorways along the path from the room where the equipment is located to where it enters the building.

Make sure to get all the pertinent photos of the equipment or work area that is part of the contract. For retrofit projects

As-built Drawings (Existing Drawings)

If doing a renovation or a design/build project it’s a good idea to ask the owner, facility engineer or there representative if they have copies of the existing MEP drawings. This can make your job a lot easier if you need to redesign the system.

Existing As-built Drawings
Existing As-built Drawings

Also, any Architectural or Structural drawings can be useful especially if your replacing equipment on the roof. If the new equipment is heavier or if the structural code has gotten more stringent from the time the building was designed and built, then you might need to submit a structural review in order to confirm that the existing structure can hold the weight of the new equipment.

It best to get these in electronic format or to take pictures of the existing drawings if not available digitally.

Tools to Bring on your Job Walks

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  1. Some form of measuring tape, whether digital or hand held.
  2. PPE Equipment. Some sites require that you bring a Hard Hat, Goggles, Fire Retardant Clothing, Safety Shoes/Boots/Vest, etc. You should always keep a set of PPE in your car, so that you are always prepared for a site walk. Even if it’s not required, it’s smart to wear protective clothing as some equipment rooms contain sharp edges and job site conditions could contain slippery or dirty surfaces.
  3. Cell phone or camera to take pictures and videos.
  4. iPad or note pad for taking notes and writing down dimensions and making sketches.
  5. Flashlight to see dark areas in mechanical rooms, attics or within equipment.
  6. A copy of the construction drawings and scope of work.

Bring Important Subcontractors & Vendor

If you are bidding on a turn key project, one where you are responsible for all of the other trades. This often occurs when the majority of the work is related to the mechanical, such as the replacement of major HVAC or Electrical equipment upgrades.

It’s also most likely that your company specializes in one of the MEP trades and will need to provide another subcontractor to do the other portions of the work. You might be an HVAC contractor that is comfortable replacing the mechanical equipment, but not in upgrading the electrical panels. It’s also possible that quite a bit of new structural work will be required to support the new equipment.

Maybe you want to bring out the manufactures representative of the major equipment that is being replaced. Be prepared to bring your team members that will be involved in providing you with the quotations you’ll need to provide a complete proposal. This is especially important on Design/Build projects where you are responsible to provide a complete and operable system per the intent of the RFP. This is also important in renovation so that your team can assess the existing conditions in order to apply reasonable labor factors.

Sheet Metal Takeoff – Test 3

In the next two test you will be required to measure the lengths of the ductwork using the bar scale shown on each drawing. Print the enclosed drawings or use a distance measuring software program like Bluebeam so that you can accurately measure the distances for each duct length based on the bar scale shown on the drawings, or if you have an estimating program you can import the drawing and do your takeoff.

Another method is to measure the drawing on your computer screen, which can be done by increasing the magnification of the drawing until the bar scale on the drawing matches the hand held scale you hold up to the computer screen.

In the following series of test there will be no numbered items given. It will be up to you to determine what you need. Start as always at the source or the largest duct in this case we have outlined the path to take for you, so that the answer sheet given will follow the same path. Start at the letter “A” on the diagram and proceed in alphabetical order until you finish filling in the takeoff form.

Make sure that you have completed all the practice test, including Test 1 & 2 before proceeding.

Download the PDF Drawing and Takeoff form or use your own tablet or computer to record your answers that match the list for each of the following takeoffs.

Write down a description of the duct or fitting along with the appropriate size shown. After you have completed your takeoff, check your answers with the online answer sheet. Don’t worry if the lengths are slightly different. The lengths should be close, at least within 6” or so, depending on your method of measuring.

Air Conditioning Unit Ductwork #1

Air Conditioning Ductwork #1 - Test #3
Air Conditioning Ductwork #1 – Test #3

Fill in the PDF Takeoff Form with answers to Air Conditioning Unit Ductwork #1 Image Above.

VAV High/Low & Exhaust Ductwork – Takeoff #2

Start with the High-Side Supply Mains, then the branches to VAV-1 & 2, followed by the Low Side Supply and then finish with the Exhaust ductwork. Do your best to identify every piece of duct or fitting. Be sure to follow your takeoff as shown starting at the letter “A” and progressing to “B”, then to “C”,, “D”, etc. Make sure to takeoff all the duct and fittings shown for each letter in alphabetical order so that the answer sheet will make more sense to you.

In this exercise you will be required to provide the duct lengths, so be sure to download the drawing and confirm your scale using the bar scale on the drawing before proceeding. If for some reason you can’t measure the ductwork, then proceed as in previous exercises by just indicating a section of ductwork without the length.

Download the PDF Takeoff Form if you haven’t already or use your own tablet or computer to record your answers.

VAV high / Low Side and Exhaust Ductwork #2 - Test #3
VAV high / Low Side and Exhaust Ductwork #2 – Test #3

Resources

PDF Takeoff Form

Test 3 Drawings

Answers to Test #3

Additional Sheet Metal Takeoff Chapters

Sheet Metal Takeoff – Test 2

Riser Ductwork #1

In the following series of test there will be no numbered items given. It will be up to you to determine what you need. Start as always at the source or the largest duct and continue along the main until you get to the end, and then go back and pickup each branch.

Make sure that you have completed all the practice test first.

Download the PDF Takeoff form or use your own tablet or computer to record your answers that match the list for each of the following takeoffs. These forms have more spaces than you should need for each test.

Write down a description of the duct or fitting along with the appropriate size if shown. After you have completed your takeoff, check your answers with the online answer sheet.

Exclude the 32” x 32” branch connection on the riser from your takeoff.

Sheet Metal Riser Ductwork #1 Takeoff Test
Sheet Metal Riser Ductwork #1 Takeoff Test

Fill in the PDF Takeoff Form with answers to Riser Ductwork #1 Image Above.

Sheet Metal Riser Ductwork #1 - Sheet Metal Takeoff Test #2 Form
Sheet Metal Riser Ductwork #1 – Sheet Metal Takeoff Test #2 Form

Vertical Fan Coil – Supply, Return & OSA Ductwork #2

Start with the Supply, then the Return and finish with the OSA ductwork.. Do your best to identify every piece of duct or fitting. In order to do a proper takeoff in this example you’ll need to review Section View “A” in order to correctly identify all the pieces required.

Again, don’t worry about the lengths of ducts, just indicate that there is a section of duct required. Download the PDF Takeoff Form if you haven’t already or use your own tablet or computer to record your answers.

Vertical Fan Coil - Sheet Metal Test #2
Vertical Fan Coil – Sheet Metal Test #2

Use the below section view to help you determine the correct pieces.

Elevation View of Vertical Fan Coil Sheet Metal Takeoff Test #2
Elevation View of Vertical Fan Coil Sheet Metal Takeoff Test #2
Vertical Fan Coil Sheet Metal Takeoff Test #2 Form
Vertical Fan Coil Sheet Metal Takeoff Test #2 Form

Rooftop Packaged Unit Ductwork #3

Download the PDF Takeoff form or use your own tablet or computer to record your answers that match the list for each of the following. Start with the Supply Air.

Compare your answers to the Answer Sheet to see how well you did. If you missed any duct or fitting try to determine why, and or spend more time familiarizing yourself with the application of that missed item.

Rooftop Packaged Unit Ductwork #3
Rooftop Packaged Unit Ductwork #3
Rooftop Packaged Unit Ductwork #3 Takeoff Form
Rooftop Packaged Unit Ductwork #3 Takeoff Form

Resources

PDF Takeoff Form

Answers to Test #2

Additional Sheet Metal Takeoff Chapters

Sheet Metal Takeoff – Test 1

VAV Low Side Ductwork #1

In the following series of test there will be no numbered items given. It will be up to you to determine what you need. Start as always at the source or the largest duct and continue along the main until you get to the end, and then go back and pickup each branch.

Make sure that you completed all the practice test first.

Download the PDF Takeoff form or use your own tablet or computer to record your answers that match the list for each of the following takeoffs. These forms have more spaces than you should need for each test.

Write down a description of the duct or fitting along with the appropriate size if shown. After you have completed your takeoff, check your answers with the online answer sheet.

VAV Low Side Ductwork Test #1
VAV Low Side Ductwork Test #1

Fill in the PDF Takeoff Form with answers to VAV Low Side Ductwork #1 Image Above.

VAV Low Side Ductwork #1 Takeoff Chart - Test #1
VAV Low Side Ductwork #1 Takeoff Form – Test #1

VAV Low Side and Exhaust Ductwork #2

Below is another VAV Low Side and Exhaust Ductwork practice takeoff for you to get comfortable recognizing how different engineers represent the various fittings that are not defined. Keep the Supply separate from the exhaust in your takeoff.

Again, don’t worry about the lengths of ducts, just indicate that there is a section of duct required. Download the PDF Takeoff Form if you haven’t already or use your own tablet or computer to record your answers.

VAV Low Side and Exhaust Ductwork #2
VAV Low Side and Exhaust Ductwork #2

Fill in the PDF Takeoff Form with answers to VAV Low Side and Exhaust Ductwork #2 Image Above.

VAV Low Side and Exhaust Ductwork #2 Takeoff Form
VAV Low Side and Exhaust Ductwork #2 Takeoff Form

VAV High Side Ductwork #3

Download the PDF Takeoff form or use your own tablet or computer to record your answers that match the list for each of the following. Begin your takeoff where indicated on the drawing as “Start Here”. Number your takeoff and identify all the VAV high side ductwork and fittings the start until finished.

Compare your answers to the Answer Sheet to see how well you did. If you missed any duct or fitting try to determine why, and or spend more time familiarizing yourself with the application of that missed item.

VAV High Side Ductwork #3
VAV High Side Ductwork #3

Fill in the PDF Takeoff Form with answers to VAV High Side Ductwork #3 Image Above.

VAV High Side Ductwork #3 Takeoff Form
VAV High Side Ductwork #3 Takeoff Form

Resources

PDF Takeoff Form

Answers to Test #1

Additional Sheet Metal Takeoff Chapters